Natural Health and the Prostate

Men worry about physical and mental function as they age.   But aging can be limited.    This is an excellent natural health article in general with many great tips to get you healthy and educated on the subjects of natural health and prostate health. By Dr. Andrew Meyers The idea that aging is inevitable can be a difficult concept for many men to accept. Aging, from the male perspective, is frequently associated with loss of physical and mental function and vitality. The implied stigma that comes with aging often prevents men from dealing with important health issues associated with the process. The goal of this article is to dispel the idea that aging has to be a limiting factor and to shed light onsome key health concerns for the 40-plus man. As my father, is in his mid-50s, I am personally witnessing the changes men face as we age. My father has always been vital and physically fit; however, his body is changing andwith it, his perspective. Sports-related injuries have taken their toll on his mobility,and he has had to adopt new approaches to his overall health. If we examine aging from a holistic perspective, we can see important health considerations among mind, body, and spirit. Whole health When we look at the aging process, some clear-cut research findings apply. We know from numerous studies that a whole foods diet high in fiber, low in saturated fat, and rich in nutrients is the best health-promoting approach.  Eating fresh vegetables and fruits rich in antioxidant nutrients and fiber helps reduce the risk factors for cancer. Consistent moderate exercise promotes cardiovascular...

Heart Disease

The ChangingParadigm Heart Disease At one time, nothing could be done about heart disease. As someone clutched their heart and gasped, we could do nothing but look on in pain. As we learned more about the heart, we developed drugs and learned how to cut open the body and partially repair the heart. Today, the death rate for all heart-related diseases is 45 percent of what it was in 1963. Many claim that drugs and surgery are the reasons for this. But, if this is so, why is “progress” slow-ing down? According to the Harvard Health Letter (January 1998), there appears to be a slight rise in the incidences of stroke and kidney disease, and a leveling of the death rate from heart disease among U.S. adults. In other words, perhaps the well-established paradigm–drugs and surgery-is not the best answer. Perhaps it is time to review our past and see what we can learn. Perhaps it is time to change the paradigm. History The history of the heart and its diseases, like all medical history, is a history of ideas: an initial idea, reinforcement of the idea, challenges to the idea, rebukes to the challenges, and, perhaps, a new idea. One of the first ideas was put forth by Erasi-stratus of Alexandria, who dissected animals and humans (probably Egyptian mummies) 2,300 years ago. He discovered the veins, arteries, and nerves, and postulated that the heart is nothing more than their junction and that the arteries contain not blood, but air, spirit, or soul (called pneuma). This entered the body through the nose, throat, and lungs-in other words, through breathing....